The Young Pharaoh

January 6, 2010

Young Pharoah

The Young Pharaoh

(Colored Pencil on White Bristle Board)

In 1922, Archeologist Howard Carter discovered the treasures of  Egyptian Pharaoh King Tutankhamen.  Carter unlocked the secret revealing the breathtaking world of golden shrines and priceless artifacts untouched by man for nearly 3,300 years.  His ultimate find awaited him at the end of his journey when he uncovered the magnificent solid gold and bejeweled death mask of the young Pharaoh.  Few kings in the history of the world, however rich beyond imagination, ever possessed such a wonderful treasure. Edward has captured the glorious color and intricate detail of this stunning mask through the medium of colored pencil.  He combines the techniques of the Old Masters with this modern medium to create striking results.

The above text is an excerpt from a brochure that was created to help market 22”x30” limited edition prints of this remarkable drawing.

Always fascinated with the ornate image of the young Tutankhamen’s golden death mask, Ed originally created an impressive drawing that detailed the face (below).

He gave that drawing to his brother Steve.

Later, while dating his future wife, Jean, Ed told her about the drawing and she was very intrigued.   “I tell you what,” Ed said, “I’ll draw you one.”   He then set out to create a new drawing that would detail the entire mask.   The result is the above work of art.

 

Young Pharaoh - Original

The Original “Young Pharaoh

(Colored Pencil on White Paper)

 

 

© Edward R. Prather.

Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Edward R. Prather is strictly prohibited.  Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Edward R. Prather with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Advertisements

Mother and Child

January 6, 2010

Mother and Child

(Black and White Charcoal on Gray Paper)

An organization connected with St. Raphael’s, New Hope, MN, commissioned Ed to do this drawing, which would be turned into an engraving on a plaque for a special award.

Ed also sold prints of this drawing and custom-colored the roses on the prints for each buyer. Ed’s wife, Jean, a vocal artist, later used “Mother and Child” as the cover art for her first CD release.

 

 

© Edward R. Prather.

Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Edward R. Prather is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Edward R. Prather with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Portrait – Other

December 18, 2009

Ed drew these portraits while studying at Atelier Lack School of Fine Art in Minneapolis, MN.

 

Woman in Smock

(Charcoal on Charcoal Paper)

 

Young Woman in Overalls

(Charcoal on Charcoal Paper)

 

 

© Edward R. Prather.

Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Edward R. Prather is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Edward R. Prather with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Industrial Art

December 18, 2009

Cutaway of Gear Shift

(Airbrush on Illustration Board)

This piece was a project Ed worked on during a commercial art course at Moorhead Technical College, Moorhead, MN.

 

 

© Edward R. Prather.

Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Edward R. Prather is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Edward R. Prather with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Jesus Crucified

December 6, 2009

Jesus Crucified

(Graphite on Bristle Board)

Some friends of Ed wanted to reassemble a 60-foot wooden sculpture of Jesus that an artist had produced years before and was now laying in pieces in the couple’s barn.  This sculpture was intended to stand on a proposed Religious Retreat the couple was planning to develop on their land.   They commissioned Ed to create a drawing that would show what the sculpture would look like when placed on a cross.

Ed used, as a reference, a small version of the Jesus sculpture that the late artist had also created.  The above drawing is Ed’s preliminary sketch.  The final work, which he gave to the couple, is a full-color drawing showing Jesus on a wooden cross.

 

 

© Edward R. Prather.

Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Edward R. Prather is strictly prohibited.  Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Edward R. Prather with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Anatomical Studies

November 10, 2009

Muscle Head

(Airbrush and Colored Pencil on Illustration Board)

 

Eight Views of the Human Skull

Eight Views of the Human Skull

(Colored Pencil on Bristle Board)

 

Study of Nasal Region and Head & Neck by Frank Netter, M.D.

Study of Nasal Region, Head and Neck by Frank Netter, M.D.

(Colored Pencil on Bristle Board)

 

 Heart (Commissioned by Summit Medical Systems)

(Air Brush and Color Pencil on Illustration Board)

 

 

© Edward R. Prather. 

Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Edward R. Prather is strictly prohibited.  Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Edward R. Prather with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Portrait – Bob Hope

November 10, 2009

Bob Hope

Bob Hope

(Black and White Charcoal on Gray Paper)

Ed was commissioned to create a series of portraits that would make up a medal of honor to be presented to the famous comedian for his years of service entertaining the troops.  This World War II era portrait of Mr. Hope is Ed’s favorite of the series.

 

 

© Edward R. Prather.

Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Edward R. Prather is strictly prohibited.  Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Edward R. Prather with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.